Tag Archives: nature photography

Bee is Mantis

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Oooh, pretty!

Praying mantis! And so well camouflaged in salvia!

Those were my first thoughts.

The WP photo prompt this week is fleeting…like beauty…life…thoughts…experience…

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and though I chose not to publish these photos previously because they disturb me and I didn’t want to disturb you,

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they perfectly illustrate fleeting as they catch the ephemeral beauty of nature

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and how living requires eating so these photos also illustrate how fleeting life is.

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The honey bee is caught,

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savored,

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beheaded

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and further savored…

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and I had to walk away from breathtaking wonder that shifted in a moment to revulsion though I recognize that the bee is the mantis and we are each both bee and mantis, and our moments as fleeting.

My 2012 in Pictures

The Losses:

My 84-year-old mom holding her 9-year-old self

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and two weeks before she passed, my father-in-law also did along with his pocketful of index cards and pens so he’d never lose an important thought

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The Blessings:

A week at the Squaw Valley Community of Writers

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and the crescent shadows during the solar eclipse

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The Joyous Victories:

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The Discoveries:

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Toni Littlejohn’s art

and Rain Fingerhut’s voice

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Peace to all of you throughout the New Year!

Elizabeth

They Hold the Sea

Contagious as your hummingbird smile may be,

it is your hands…

hands that sculpt ki into a dragon’s mouth

with arcs of mother-of-pearl framing rainbow flames

that smell of warm milk and nutmeg, while your

touch draws the breath of muscle to bone,

then deeper.

Too few lines cross your hands,

large, almost too large, they hold the sea.

 

Ki–Japanese word meaning energy or life force.

Thank you to the editor of Something Like Homesickness for first publishing this poem.

Are There Lizards in Your Family Tree?

Are There Lizards in Your Family Tree?

Do you scuttle lithely sand and stone,

peek out from rocks through half-shut lids

while others’ hands are clasped in dance

beneath the bone-white crescent slit?

 

Are your eyes autonomous,

right darts to lips and left to toes;

as softer flesh sips steamed orgeat

do you watch the spoon, the ankles cross?

 

Do you begin each day with push-ups

then shield yourself from sun in shade;

when threatened do your muscles flex,

your speech reduce to a chortling hiss?

 

Do others comment, How cold your hands,

How dry your skin—do you dream of

grasshoppers sweet in your mouth, or

screaming wake from the jaws of a snake?

 

Thank you to the editor of Something Like Homesickness for first publishing this poem.